Act Now: Uncover the Silent Perils of Asbestos in Fire-Damaged Buildings – A Deep Dive into the Brighton Hotel Incident

Asbestos in fire

The recent fire at the Royal Albion Hotel in Brighton has reignited concerns about asbestos in fire situations. Brighton and Hove City Council confirmed that asbestos was present in the building, specifically within the textured ceiling coatings. Despite the fire, the risk to the public was deemed very low, and the area around the hotel was cordoned off to prevent potential exposure.

As reported on the ITV News website

This incident underscores the need for a deeper understanding of asbestos in fire situations, particularly when it’s used in textured coatings. What exactly is asbestos textured coating? What risks does it pose, especially when it’s in good condition or damaged by fire? Let’s explore this further.

What is Asbestos Textured Coating?

Asbestos textured coating, often known by the brand name “Artex,” is a type of surface coating that was commonly used for interior walls and ceilings in buildings. It was particularly popular from the 1960s through the 1980s and beyond due to its ability to create decorative finishes and its fire-resistant properties.

The coating is a mixture of materials, including a small percentage of asbestos, typically Chrysotile (White) asbestos. The asbestos fibres are mixed into a binder, which hardens to create a textured, durable surface. This coating was often used to create a variety of patterns on ceilings and walls, adding a decorative element to the room.

Asbestos Textured Coating can be found in various locations such as bathroom ceilings, hallway ceilings, and window surrounds.

Risks of Asbestos Textured Coating in Good Condition

When in good condition and left undisturbed, asbestos textured coatings generally pose a minimal risk to health. This is due to the nature of the material and how the asbestos fibres are bound within it.

The asbestos fibres in textured coatings are mixed into a binder, which hardens and forms a solid, semi-durable surface. This process effectively traps the asbestos fibres within the material. As long as the coating remains intact and undisturbed, the asbestos fibres are unlikely to be released into the air. Therefore, the risk of inhaling asbestos fibres, which is the primary route of exposure and cause of asbestos-related diseases, is significantly reduced.

However, it’s important to note that while the risk is low, it is not entirely eliminated. Even in good condition, if the asbestos textured coating is disturbed – for example, during refurbishment or demolition activities – the asbestos fibres can be released. This is why an assessment should be carried out to determine if asbestos is present prior to carrying out any work that could potentially disturb the fabric of the building.

Additionally, while the coating may be in good condition now, it’s important to regularly monitor the condition of any known asbestos-containing materials in your property. Over time, wear and tear, water damage, or other factors could potentially damage the coating and increase the risk of asbestos exposure.

Asbestos In Fire – Increased Risks with Fire Damage

When a building containing asbestos textured coating experiences fire damage, the risks associated with asbestos exposure significantly increase.

Here’s why:

Fire, by its very nature, is a destructive force. It can cause extensive damage to the structure of a building, including the materials used in its construction. When a fire affects a building with asbestos textured coating, the high temperatures and intense conditions can compromise the integrity of the coating. This can lead to the breakdown of the material, potentially releasing the trapped asbestos fibres into the air.

Once these asbestos fibres are released, they become a serious health hazard. Asbestos fibres are microscopic and can easily become airborne. Once in the air, they can be inhaled by individuals in the surrounding areas. This is particularly concerning because asbestos is a known carcinogen. When inhaled, these fibres can become lodged in the lungs, leading to serious health conditions such as lung cancer and mesothelioma, often many years after the initial exposure.

Furthermore, the destruction caused by a fire can also lead to the disturbance of other asbestos-containing materials in the building. This can further increase the amount of asbestos released into the environment.

It’s also important to note that the risk doesn’t end once the fire is extinguished. The cleanup and recovery process can also disturb the asbestos, leading to additional exposure. For instance, if the debris from the fire is not properly handled and disposed of, it can lead to further release of asbestos fibres.

In summary, while asbestos textured coatings in good condition pose minimal risk, fire damage can significantly increase the potential for asbestos exposure. This underscores the importance of proper asbestos management and remediation strategies in the aftermath of a fire.

Risks of Asbestos Fibers Becoming Airborne During a Fire

The risk of asbestos in fire and the fibres becoming airborne significantly increases during a fire, especially in a building with asbestos-containing materials like textured coatings.

Here’s a deeper look into why this happens and the potential consequences:

During a fire, the intense heat and destructive forces can cause the breakdown of asbestos-containing materials. As these materials break down, they can release asbestos fibres into the air. The heat of the fire can cause these fibres to rise and become part of the smoke plume, potentially spreading the fibres over a large area.

The turbulence caused by the fire can also contribute to the spread of asbestos fibres. The strong air currents created by the heat can carry these fibres, further increasing the area of potential contamination. This means that even areas that were not directly affected by the fire could still be at risk of asbestos contamination.

Once asbestos fibres are airborne, they pose a significant health risk. These fibres are small and can remain in the air for a long time, making them easy to inhale. When inhaled, they can become lodged in the lungs and can lead to serious health conditions such as asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma.

It’s also important to note that the risk doesn’t end when the fire is extinguished. The debris and dust left behind after a fire can also contain asbestos fibres. If this debris is disturbed, for example during cleanup operations, it can release more fibres into the air.

In conclusion, the risk of fibres becoming airborne is significantly increased during a fire. This highlights the importance of proper safety measures, including wearing appropriate protective equipment and following safe procedures during cleanup and recovery operations. It also underscores the need for professional asbestos assessment and remediation after a fire in a building known to contain asbestos.

Remediation of an Asbestos in Fire-Damaged Building Containing Asbestos Textured Coating

After a fire in a building with asbestos textured coating, a specific remediation process should be followed. First, a thorough risk assessment should be conducted by trained professionals to identify the presence and extent of asbestos contamination. This includes air monitoring to detect any airborne asbestos fibres.

Next, a controlled demolition or repair of the damaged sections should be carried out by licensed contractors. This process should be done in a way that minimises the release of asbestos fibres, often involving the use of specialised equipment and containment strategies.

Finally, a thorough cleaning of the site should be conducted. This includes the removal of asbestos debris and dust, followed by a final air clearance test to ensure that the asbestos in fire risk has been effectively managed.

Get Help With Your Asbestos Problem

At Acorn Analytical Services, we understand the complexities and risks associated with asbestos and asbestos in fire. As a fully independent asbestos consultancy, we’re committed to providing comprehensive, reliable, and professional services to help you navigate the challenges of asbestos management.

Whether you’re dealing with asbestos in fire damaged building, planning a renovation, or simply want to ensure the safety of your property, our team of experts is here to help. We offer a range of services, including asbestos surveys, asbestos removal management, asbestos air monitoring, or full asbestos compliance through the Acorn Asbestos Antidote.

Don’t let the presence of asbestos become a daunting challenge. With our expertise and commitment to safety, we can help you manage asbestos effectively and responsibly.

Ready to take the next step?

Contact us today for a consultation or get a quote. Let’s work together to create a safer environment for everyone.

Neil Munro

I work in a dual role at Acorn Analytical Services focused primarily on growing and leading the business from our Northampton office base. My focus is on overseeing all sales, marketing and financial activities from Northampton. I assist clients with high-level asbestos management strategies and training. Together with Ian Stone I host our weekly podcast – Asbestos Knowledge Empire and I'm Co-author of Asbestos The Dark Arts and Fear and Loathing of Health and Safety.

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